Notebook

Jan 11

“I urge you to protect your good name and refuse to sign such unworthy and inaccurate missives in the future.” — Elizabeth May, Leader of The Green Party of Canada, in a hard-hitting but respectful reply to Natural Resources Minister Joe Oliver’s open letter of January 9, 2012. Via @thetyee and @RyanPainterShow on Twitter.

Four goals for 2012

These are the four goals I’ve set for myself this year.

And now a quick update (because we’re already 11 days into January.

Goal 1: Doing well on this front.

Goal 2: No progress to report on this front. When I’m busy, this is the first thing that falls off my to do list. That needs to change if I want to live to be 94 or 97, like my two grandmothers did.

Goal 3. Major success. Will have more to say about this in a few months’ time.

Goal 4. Have come up with a plan. Happy and excited about the possibilities on this front.

“When we reach beyond ourselves, maybe, just maybe, we set in motion something that will resonate through those tied to us in ways we might not foresee.” — Rebecca Altman, Reach Beyond Yourself, via @odemagazine on Twitter.

Jan 09

Apparently, using a cookie cutter to cut shapes out of a grilled cheese sandwich isn’t going to cut it anymore. 
guardian:

lunchboxawesome:

Bento Day 79:
Z requested this one… I hope he eats his lunch and doesn’t sling them across the room! =)

Parents in Japan have been ­turning their lunchboxes into works of art  known as Kyaraben or cartoon bento. Now the trend has spread to the US  where graphic designer Heather ­Sitarzewski has been making her son his  own pasta Miss Piggys and grape-nosed Mickey Mouses every day. Suddenly cutting off the sandwich crusts seems like less of a chore… See a whole gallery of lunchboxes made awesome images here.

Apparently, using a cookie cutter to cut shapes out of a grilled cheese sandwich isn’t going to cut it anymore. 

guardian:

lunchboxawesome:

Bento Day 79:

Z requested this one… I hope he eats his lunch and doesn’t sling them across the room! =)

Parents in Japan have been ­turning their lunchboxes into works of art known as Kyaraben or cartoon bento. Now the trend has spread to the US where graphic designer Heather ­Sitarzewski has been making her son his own pasta Miss Piggys and grape-nosed Mickey Mouses every day. Suddenly cutting off the sandwich crusts seems like less of a chore… See a whole gallery of lunchboxes made awesome images here.

(Source: )

Library Love -

I can’t believe I live in a world where libraries are under threat. Libraries.

Things are beyond serious in Toronto. Every library lover needs to speak out (again).

Here’s how.

Dec 22

Do Journalists Have Brands? This J-School Student Says Yes.

Happy Short Story Day!

Because today (December 22) is the shortest day of the year, it’s the day when we celebrate the shortest but most brilliant form of literature, the short story. (It’s actually a UK holiday, but the rest of us are encouraged to join in.) You can listen to short stories on the National Short Story Day website. Or write a very short one of your own (ten words maximum) and share it via Twitter.

If you’re looking for a terrific short story to read at some point during the day, here’s a link to one of my all-time favourites, Charles D’Ambriosio’s Her Real Name.

Finally, here’s a roundup of the short story collections I’ve read over the past year, along with mini-reviews of each. 

“Because bereavement and clinical depression share overlapping symptoms, the current version of the DSM prohibits prescribing psychiatric medications until two months after the death of a loved one. In the proposed DSM-5, this period is reduced to just two weeks.” 
And yet medication can’t take away the pain of losing someone you love. If anything, numbing the pain will only delay the painful but necessary process of grieving. Grief is patient. It will wait for you.
Read more: http://www.utne.com/Mind-Body/Mourning-In-America-Medicalization-Of-Bereavement.aspx#ixzz1hH6ohhXP
utnereader:

It’s a cardinal human experience: Someone we love dies, and we grieve  the loss. This powerful emotion has inspired scores of poets, from  Aeschylus to Jay-Z, and serves as the central metaphor of humanity for  at least one of the world’s major religions.
In contemporary Western psychology, however, bereavement represents a  conundrum. A depressed mood, diminished pleasure in normal activities,  disrupted appetite and sleep patterns, thoughts of death—these are the  hallmarks of bereavement. And they’re also the measures clinicians use  to diagnose treatable depression. This confusion is reopening the debate  over what constitutes mental health.
Keep reading …

Because bereavement and clinical depression share overlapping symptoms, the current version of the DSM prohibits prescribing psychiatric medications until two months after the death of a loved one. In the proposed DSM-5, this period is reduced to just two weeks.”

And yet medication can’t take away the pain of losing someone you love. If anything, numbing the pain will only delay the painful but necessary process of grieving. Grief is patient. It will wait for you.


Read more: http://www.utne.com/Mind-Body/Mourning-In-America-Medicalization-Of-Bereavement.aspx#ixzz1hH6ohhXP

utnereader:

It’s a cardinal human experience: Someone we love dies, and we grieve the loss. This powerful emotion has inspired scores of poets, from Aeschylus to Jay-Z, and serves as the central metaphor of humanity for at least one of the world’s major religions.

In contemporary Western psychology, however, bereavement represents a conundrum. A depressed mood, diminished pleasure in normal activities, disrupted appetite and sleep patterns, thoughts of death—these are the hallmarks of bereavement. And they’re also the measures clinicians use to diagnose treatable depression. This confusion is reopening the debate over what constitutes mental health.

Keep reading …

Dec 20

“Here we were, a generation of workers fueling the largest expansion of business since the transcontinental railroad and we didn’t have living wage jobs or benefits. The bigger these companies got, the more we were asked to give. The start-up model where everyone worked 72 hours a week and got paid nothing had become the new standard of productivity and wage rates.” — Vanessa Veselka, In the Wake of Protest: One Woman’s Attempt to Unionize Amazon, The Atlantic (December 12, 2011).

#LieoftheYear The person who is texting you is telling you the truth. (Sorry, they're likely to be lying, according to research from UBC.) -

UBC researchers, who have a knack for uncovering the most fascinating facts about human behaviour, have discovered that people who are communicating via text message are more likely to be playing fast and easy with the truth than people who are using other modes of communication. The more anonymous the method of communication, the greater the tendency to be “morally lax,” the researchers report.